Sunday Sermon and Some Sidewalk Sketches

7 Mar

“It’s never too late to say you’re sorry. But first, you  have to say it, then more importantly, you have to mean it. Otherwise, it’s just more lies.”

~ Toni Armenta Andrukaitis

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“You never depart from us, but yet, only with difficulties do we return to You.” 

― Saint Augustine, Confessions

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Today is the Fourth Sunday of Lent. We had a different Gospel at 9 o’clock Mass than all the other Masses, so we didn’t hear the Prodigal Son story. I always liked that one, so I’ll give you my view on it. The prodigal son returns home after taking off, and squandering away his inheritance, while the other son remained home, faithfully working hard for his father. The father rejoiced and prepared a feast for the repentant, starving son, and the good son was mad. So here’s the thing. A father can’t help but love his children. The prodigal son was very sorry, repentant, and knew how wrong he was. There’s the key…he was sorry. Unless you are sorry and repentant, I don’t think you can be forgiven. Just sayin’.

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The Gospel is from St. Luke 15:1-3, 11-32.

 This reading recounts the parable of the Prodigal Son, one of Jesus’ most beautiful parables. It teaches us once more that God is a kind and understanding Father. 

This is what he tells the faithful son…

He said to him,
‘My son, you are here with me always;

everything I have is yours.

But now we must celebrate and rejoice,

because your brother was dead and has come to life again;

he was lost and has been found.’”

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After Mass, I took a two hour walk around the neighborhood. It’s a good time to think. I do a lot of thinking. I do a lot of walking. But, I’m never too contemplative to ignore the beauty along the way. I love when I stumble upon fun things like kids drawing on the sidewalk with chalk. It’s refreshing to see budding artists sharing their masterpieces.

   
   
 
Very talented children. 

  

One Response to “Sunday Sermon and Some Sidewalk Sketches”

  1. Brenda Davis Harsham March 10, 2016 at 5:24 am #

    If people never acknowledge that they did anything wrong, can you forgive them? I used to think not, but then I realized that not forgiving them hurts me more than them. Forgiveness is tricky. It would seem to be important for the wrongdoer to be forgiven, but it’s more important for the wronged to forgive. Because they need to move on. The wrongdoer almost always moves on. Without another thought. Isn’t that odd? Took me a long time to work all that out.

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